Triangle PerformanceAT C-LEVEL - February 2008
In this issue
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FROM THE TOP
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STRATEGY & LEADERSHIP
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Sit down, shut up, and color!
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MUSINGS
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You're Going to Spend it Anyway!
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Printable Version
PRINTABLE VERSION
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From the Top

We made it past the "new year," and are midway through Q1. Now's the time to make sure you've got solid, realistic plans in place, and the resources - human and otherwise - to pull off those plans.

In other words, prepare to plan. Or is it the other way around??

I always forget. Either way, it means the old adage: "Success occurs when preparation meets opportunity." Nowhere is that more true than in business growth and leadership development

Many of you have asked what sort of specific work we do at Triangle Performance. I won't dilute this newsletter by blatant marketing hubris, but will provide a link that will take you to a sampling of completed and ongoing 2007-2008 projects and efforts. Feel free to contact me at the number or email below if you have any questions.

As always, I welcome your perusal and gratis downloads of the new and relevant material (articles, papers, etc.) on the website. My most recent article, From Peer to Manager: 4 Steps to a Successful Transition is relevant to most of us.

Don't forget to check out my blogs; several recent entries:

On Leadership: includes comments on the significance of leadership with our customers, and comments on that "empowerment" stuff...

On HR: has a brief mention of the current and future status of HR in organizations, and compensation philosophy...

As always, I hope this finds you well, both personally and professionally. Please give me a call if ever I can help in any way.

Warm Regards,

D. Kevin Berchelmann

D. Kevin Berchelmann
President
Triangle Performance, LLC
www.triangleperformance.com
kevinb@triangleperformance.com
281.257.4442

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Strategy & Leadership
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return to top
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Sit down, shut up, and color!
-- Pretend like you're actually here TO WORK!!

Unless it's our specific business, we aren't a day-care (if I have any such subscribers, due apologies). As such, conflict resolution should only be a part of our accountabilities as it relates to making the business successful.

In other words, we aren't resolving conflict merely to create some kumbaya-looking harmonious state; we resolve conflict so employees will work better and are more productive. Some tension among diverse thinkers is a good thing; other conflicts are clearly disruptive. The key, of course, is sorting out the differences.

Sometimes, the right answer can be taken from a day-care playbook:

Sit down, shut up, and color.

Quit touching her.

Don't make me stop this car.

The list goes on.

They all mean the same thing -- "Drop the petty stuff and get back to work." Why is that so hard??

I know that sounds heartless, but we are actually paying these folks, right? I don't think saying, "Hey, I paid you last week -- do your job and quit starting trouble" is terribly out of line. In fact, we should probably say it more often.

Yes, there are times when conflict resolution skills come in handy; times when more finesse and delicate handling is called for. But let's be real -- that's not the norm. Too frequently, we get involved in regular, interpersonal dynamics that have little to do with business productivity or success, and everything to do with one employee's general dislike of another.

I've lost count of the number of clients, colleagues, executives and friends (yes, there's a lot of overlap there) who have exclaimed how unique it is to actually hire someone who simply comes to work, works a full day, then goes home. Lose the drama, folks; it just doesn't belong here.

Stay focused on what matters. Don't hesitate to say, "Sit down, shut up, and color."

If that doesn't work, put them in time-out, and take away their s'mores.

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Musings
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You're Going to Spend it Anyway!
-- May as well get something for your money.

I'm talking about your Compensation System.

Is it the engine that drives your organization, propelling it forward at sometimes-mach speed? Or is it an albatross, fitted snugly and heavily around your neck, acting effectively as an organizational "anchor?"

It can be the former, if we just give it some serious attention.

Your Compensation System, called "Total Rewards" by compensation geeks, consists principally of three components: Cash, Benefits, and Perquisites. Some try to sneak in "work environment," which is also important. It just isn't a part of our Compensation System.

Cash is just that: green folding stuff in various forms. It includes base compensation, incentives and bonuses (yes, those are different!), and other reasonably direct cash payments, including (generally) deferred compensation and employer contributions to deferred plans - both incentive and retirement.

Benefits are those employee welfare assistance plans, such as medical, dental, and disability insurances. Also included here are vacation, PTO, and the employee-side of various retirement plans (including long-term deferred compensation).

Perquisites, or "Perks," are those things specifically allowed or provided by the organization that have a dollar value or worth to an employee. This includes automobiles, special trips, some seminar incentives, club memberships, and in some cases, unique work arrangements.

Now, knowing my definitions of Compensation System components doesn't mean a whit to you, unless we can further define what it means to your organization. Is it simply an expense? One more line item in an endless sea of operational costs - and a damned big one at that??

Or is it truly an investment of sorts?

How about we agree that it's somewhere in between those two extremes? Compensation - all three components mentioned above - are, in fact, a heavy burden on an organization's expenses. They can also, however, be similar to an investment if we take the time to align - really align - our Compensation System with our business strategy.

In this small newsletter space, that simply means we:

1.Manage compensation on a relatively consistent basis, and

2.We understand the "levers" that our Compensation System can use to further our organizational objectives.

In other words... that we get what we pay for.

WHAT, you say???! That's crazy talk...

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© 2008 Triangle Performance, LLC
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